Frequently Asked Questions

These are the most common questions asked by out patients. If you don;t find the answer you are looking for here send us your question on our contact page.




COMMON QUESTIONS

  • What can a Psychiatrist do for me?
  • Will my treatment be kept confidential?
  • How long will my treatment last?
  • What determines if my mental illness will come back?
What can a Psychiatrist do for me?

A Psychiatrist is a certified medical professional that specializes in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of mental illness and psychological problems.  A Psychiatrist has completed medical school, in addition to at least four years of training in the field.  Psychiatrists are not only trained to diagnose and manage mental illness, but are also adept at providing psychotherapy.  Certain specializations within Psychiatry require additional years of training and qualification.  Within the profession, each Psychiatrist has specific areas of interest and specialization but has the skills to provide treatment from multiple approaches.

Will my treatment be kept confidential?

We will not reveal any information regarding what happens within the work that we do together unless you have signed the Authorization to Disclose Information form.  In the instance that you are in danger of harming yourself or another, then we are obligated by law to notify the authorities of this.

How long will my treatment last?

There are no precise determinations that we can make regarding the length of your treatment.  Generally speaking, the longer you have had your mental illness not medically acknowledged, the longer the treatment will take.  Certain conditions do not require a lot of time to treat, and others considerably more.  Certain mental illnesses require just a couple of visits, and others require life long maintenance.  We believe that you should seek treatment as soon as possible, for the best outcome.

What determines if my mental illness will come back?

There are a few components that play a part in the recurrence of mental illness.
Coexisting stresses in life: often times, a mental illness will recur if there are additional life stressors (family or marital problems, starting a new job, losing someone close to you).

Age: more often than not, if someone is diagnosed with a mental illness earlier than later in life, there is a higher likelihood of the illness recurring.

Diagnosis: Some mental illnesses are more common to recur than others.  Some of the ones on the list that are more likely to come back are: OCD, drug and alcohol addiction, eating disorders, and bipolar disorder.


  • What will happen during my first appointment?
  • Will the cost of my treatment be covered by my insurance plan?
  • How can I prevent mental illness coming back?
  • What if I have an emergency or an urgent situation come up?
What will happen during my first appointment?

We will meet with you for an extensive interview and psychiatric evaluation in which we will gather some information such as your history, symptoms, and family dynamics.  Within this first session together, we will then determine the best plan of action to move forward.

Will the cost of my treatment be covered by my insurance plan?

Depending on what type of insurance provider you are currently using, coverage for our services will vary.  Many insurance companies reimburse anywhere from 50-80% of the total cost of services.  We take payments are the beginning of each session, and take cash, checks, and all major credit cards.

How can I prevent mental illness coming back?

We give you guidance and protocols to adhere to both inside and outside of our office.  Follow the treatment regimen and plan of action that we prescribe.  Make sure that you follow the medication regimen, attend the  psychotherapy and counseling sessions, and keep your life as balanced as you can.  It is very important to try and avoid stressful situations, let your loved ones help you whenever possible, and seek help the moment you feel like your mental illness is coming back or getting worse.

What if I have an emergency or an urgent situation come up?

If you find yourself in the midst of an emergency, please immediately call 9-1-1.  If you have an urgent situation, call our office, and we will see you as soon as we can.



KETAMINE FAQs

  • Where is the treatment performed?
  • How many ketamine infusions will I receive?
  • What should I expect during ketamine therapy?
  • If ketamine therapy works for me how soon will I begin to feel better?
  • I am bi-polar, will ketamine make me hypomanic?
  • Are ketamine infusions addictive?
  • Can I eat or drink before my appointment?
  • Will my insurance company pay for ketamine therapy?
Where is the treatment performed?

All ketamine treatment is outpatient and is performed in our office

How many ketamine infusions will I receive?

That will depend on your response. Most patients receive a series of six infusions.

What should I expect during ketamine therapy?

Ketamine is administered over a period of 40 minutes. The dose is determined by your weight. The amount of ketamine administered is not enough to cause a loss of consciousness, so you will remain awake. During the infusion some patients experience odd perceptions—like seeing bright colors. Some report what is referred to as a “dissociative”, or “out of body” experience. These are side effects of ketamine that may be important for ketamine’s ultimate effectiveness. Most patients tolerate the experiences with no trouble, and many people find them pleasant. Once the infusion is complete, the dissociative effects of the drug rapidly dissipate. There are no delayed “flashbacks,” and patients generally leave the office within 30 minutes following the infusion and feel quite normal.

If ketamine therapy works for me how soon will I begin to feel better?

Some patients will begin to feel better within hours of the first infusion. Patients with thoughts of self-harm often notice those thoughts dissipating first. There can be a dramatic relief of dread and hopelessness. Other patients may not notice any mood improvement until the next day. Some patients will require a second (or even a third) infusion before feeling better.

I am bi-polar, will ketamine make me hypomanic?

Hypomania has not been reported following ketamine therapy.

Are ketamine infusions addictive?

No.

Can I eat or drink before my appointment?

You cannot eat for the 4 hours prior to your scheduled appointment. You may have clear liquids up until 2 hours before your appointment.

Will my insurance company pay for ketamine therapy?

Because ketamine therapy for mood and anxiety disorders is recent and still viewed as experimental, insurance companies may not provide reimbursement.


  • Will Ketamine Therapy help my treatment resistant depression?
  • What happens after my series of ketamine infusions?
  • Will I require ketamine infusions for the rest of my life?
  • Are there other side effects I should be concerned about?
  • What medical conditions could keep me from receiving ketamine?
  • Do I need to bring someone with me?
  • Will my current psychiatric medications interfere with ketamine treatment?
Will Ketamine Therapy help my treatment resistant depression?

Based on searches of major medical centers over the past fifteen years, and in our experience, up to 70% of all patients can expect significant, and fast, relief. Of course, we cannot predict any individual’s results.  Our treatment is tailored in terms of frequency and dosage to each person, and we believe it offers your best chance of success.

What happens after my series of ketamine infusions?

Following the initial series of infusions, most patients choose to begin a maintenance program, returning for single infusions intermittently. The interval between maintenance infusions varies from patient to patient.

Will I require ketamine infusions for the rest of my life?

No. Some patients seem to achieve long-term relief after a series of infusions.

Are there other side effects I should be concerned about?

Occasionally patients experience some nausea following an infusion. If so, there is medication that will help. More rarely, a patient may experience a transient headache. Patients can expect to be tired following the infusion. Very, very rarely, patients already at risk for seizure have reportedly experienced one. If you have a seizure disorder, please be sure to discuss it with your doctor prior to receiving ketamine therapy.

What medical conditions could keep me from receiving ketamine?

There are very few. Dr. Mensah will discuss contraindications with you before you receive your first infusion.

Do I need to bring someone with me?

You do not need to have someone bring you or accompany you during the infusion, but we request that you have someone bring you home. We advise you not to drive a car until the following morning.

Will my current psychiatric medications interfere with ketamine treatment?

Anti-depressant medications (SSRIs, MAOIs, and tricyclics) do not interfere with ketamine, and there is no need to stop them. Ketamine infusions can provide relief during the time it takes antidepressant medications to begin working. Important: You should not decrease or stop taking any prescribed medication without first consulting your prescribing physician.


Copyright © 2008-2018. All rights reserved | Website services by WebWorkz